We had long been talking in our department about interdisciplinary with other subject areas but getting it off the ground was difficult. This is when we looked at the situation from another perspective and thought why don’t we do it internally; multidisciplinary projects within the Performing Arts?

In Grade 6 and 7 all students have to take Drama, Dance, Music and Theatre Design. We took the decision to combine two disciplines where they have to create a single product over the course of a semester. So, Grade 6 attend Dance and Music where they have to compose a dance and a piece of music to a certain theme (first semester ‘personality traits’ and the other in second semester ‘opposites’). In Drama and Theatre Design they devise small theatrical pieces and make costume elements, and then in the second semester create puppets for a self-devised piece.

Grade 7 we switch it up with the aim of challenging student perceptions and thinking. We combine, Dance with Drama and then Music with Theatre Design. These couplings that are not so ‘natural’ produce some excellent work and I have been surprised by the willingness, and openness the students have approached the tasks. The end of unit performances this past semester were particularly strong which surprised, not only us, but the students. Putting ‘unexpected’ elements together is an identified tool to help enhance creative thinking (and an upcoming blog post).

We leave the actual creating of the final work till quite late and spent the majority of time through the unit skill building. Students spent one lesson a week in each of the two disciplines they are doing for the semester. In my context, through dance, a focus on how to abstract movement from words and gestures, working with choreographic tools. In the Music class they anaylsis pieces through listening tasks, learn some basic theory and work on composition skills. These are independent lessons, music and dance, but are ‘sold’ to the students as one course, for example we look at how to compose music and choreograph  dance over a two week period using the same stimulus “rollercoaster”. All the time we push students beyond ‘the first thing’ they think of while doing any type of creating. Trying to get them into a habit of producing multiple alternatives, a great little tool to demonstrate this is the 10x2 artful thinking activity.

Our goal is that when we arrive at the final product the students should be in a semi-autonomous state, where they only need guiding questions and prompting. We provide boundaries – what needs to be included – and continually guide them with feedback.

There are loads of positives doing these multidisciplinary project based units and we make sure that there is an authentic audience at the conclusion by inviting parents. Beyond that:

  • It is a collaborative process, students work in groups of three to six and have to deal with compromises – finding strategies to work effectively together.
  • Changes perceptions about how disciplines can be combined to create. Students often enter with a “but how will we do this? What will it look like?” attitude. Even Music and Dance which are a ‘natural pairing’ students are encouraged to develop dance content without having finished composing music. This order (or simultaneous creating) is difficult for students because it breaks with expectations.
  • Tracking student progress. The constant communication with colleagues allows consistency with students across the different disciplines.
  • Reduced planning time, as we do the same lesson twice a week, the second time round with the experience of the first is often an improved version.
  • Reduced grading time. The students are receiving an overall grade for Performing Arts, some activities that are not subject specific like writing artistic intentions, reflections, exploring the stimulus are divided between the teachers and moderated. It reduces our grading load for these classes by half.
  • Students that are learning English benefit from communication and explanation from peers.
  • Makes the creative process explicit. Throughout the skill building phase we work with constraints, metaphors and producing LOTS of alternatives/solutions.
  • During the final product stage, it is a genuine problem that has to be looked at in detail and requires an analytical and playful approach.
  • Having showings during the process raises the quality, students are encouraged to work harder when they see what other groups are capable of producing.
  • Differentiation. Students choose their own  groups, which manifests in pushing each other to achieve higher (in almost all combinations, although you always get one group…)

The multidisciplinary approach has been a very successful model within our context and one that we really enjoying teaching. I am positive it could easily work in other subject areas as well. Please feel free to ask if you have any questions on how we structure it.

 

Feature image by Nela

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