Recently I read an article on the value of school musicals… as we were fast approaching opening night of our own, which I was directing. So, here is my take on it.

“We do on stage things that are supposed to happen off. Which is a kind of integrity, if you look on every exit as being an entrance somewhere else.”
– Tom Stoppard, from Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead

After five months of rehearsals (five months for three performances!) ask any student if they think it was worth it, I’m fairly certain they would tell you ‘yes’. As with all creative endeavors it’s not just the end product but the process of practise and decision making that contains the learning, and if not the adrenalin kick of performing, the enrichment.

There are triumphant moments and loads of challenges which at the end an audience sit and (hopefully) marvel at the spectacle. What is behind the illusion on stage often gets overlooked, or never considered. Real life skills plus a multitude of learning moments are ingrained in rehearsing.

For one, anybody who thinks they can do something the first time for stage and do it right, is wrong. The students heard the word “again” come out my mouth more than any other. Characterisation is a process of empathy and experimentation, a unique mix of yourself and the qualities of the character whose role you have, every interpretation is different. Singing is about practice and refinement, as is learning to be in time with the music and each other while dancing a choreography.

Second, if you get it right once it doesn’t mean it will be right the next time… or the next time.. or the next time but the more you get it right the more consistent it will be. It is to be blunt, damn hard work, although outsiders often see it as just playing around (upcoming post soon about ‘why dance school is harder than medical school’).

Third, it is full of practical skill building. Dancing, singing and acting require coordination, active listening, body awareness, control, expression, spatial awareness, self awareness, confidence, projection, timing and empathy.

When all three are performed together, well it’s communication in a very complex form. Think about it, singing and dancing simultaneously while pretending to be someone else.

Fourth, teamwork/collaboration. The people on stage, have to work with, and trust each other to develop and produce a successful performance but they are still only a small piece of the puzzle. Costume, makeup, set designers, stage hands, light and sound technicians… Nothing looks or sounds good without them. Their process also begins at the same time as rehearsals, decisions in one creative field affect (and inspire) another, therefore clear communication between them is vital. I cannot stress how much I make the performers aware and appreciative of the people that get them to the stage and keep them looking good on it.

Fifth, it builds relationships. It is an extraordinary situation, school leavers with those starting middle school. Everyone is a stakeholder in a common goal. Students connect over similar interests that they only get to share through this unique situation. They build surprising, meaningful bonds.

Sixth, it installs an environment of responsibility. Everybody has a responsibility to know their lines, choreography and harmony. You don’t want to let yourself down, God forbid anybody else. It also gives older students the opportunity to mentor younger, and this often happens without any prompting.

Seventh, dealing with disappointment. Things do not always go right, as is the nature of live performance. Rehearsals are can be left on a low because it didn’t go as anticipated. Audiences do not always like what they see (and are usually happy enough to tell you). Getting back on the horse, being resilient and learning from those experiences is a vital part of the performer’s skill set.

Eighth, improvisation. Built during rehearsals to develop content. This is a demanding undertaking, you put yourself and your ideas totally on the line. It helps to build confidence to deal with things that go wrong in the moment which has a lot to do with being open, listening and being able to respond. Improvisation gets better with practise.

Ninth, inclusion. This one cannot be understated. Along with the tiaras and tantrums of the divas, the school musical picks up many students that sit on the social fringes. These kids are suddenly integral to a project and its success, no matter how much of an oddball their peers may think they are. The realisation that social ineptitude is actually a quirky personality with a wealth of passion.

Tenth, fulfillment and fun. At the end of the day it’s exhausting, has plenty of moments of frustration, numerous challenges and problems to be solved but it is simply fun and fills the proverbial cup to the brim. Very little that I have experienced has that same swelling feeling in the lungs and throat with a compelling urge to dance, topped off with pride and accomplishment when the cast sing the finale in a production that took five months to piece together. This is far from an exhaustive list so here is my plus one:

Eleventh. It explicitly details the creative process.

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Header image by Nela Fletcher – see more here

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